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Conference Program
 
Catecholamines
August 9-14, 2009
University of New England
Biddeford, ME

Related Meeting Information
The Catecholamines Gordon Research Conference was held in conjunction with the Catecholamines Gordon Research Seminar. Please refer to the Catecholamines GRS web page for more information.

The 2009 GRC on Catecholamines will focus on cutting-edge developments in catecholamine research. In recent years, catecholamines have been the focus of investigations using a broad range of approaches from molecular biology to behavior and clinical studies. One of the characteristics of the field is that neuronal systems using catecholamines have much in common, although investigators who focus on particular catecholamines or on different actions of the same catecholamine are often unaware of complementary aspects of catecholamine research. It is increasingly apparent that continued progress will require increasingly integrated approaches in studies of catecholamine biology, function and dysfunction. Thus, molecular biologists are being drawn to more integrated systems approaches and behavioral biologists are exploiting many molecular approaches. In addition, because DA, NE and epinephrine serve as neurotransmitters and hormones throughout the phylogenetic scale, studies are possible in simple organisms where powerful genetic tools are available. Finally, very recent work allows the elucidation of catecholamine neurotransmission during natural animal behaviors, an important focus of the 2009 sessions. Thus, in the 2009 meeting talks will range from very basic research on mechanisms of catecholamine neurotransmission to talks integrating catecholamine physiology, pharmacology, neuroendocrinology, and behavior. Furthermore, the past few years have witnessed a tremendous advance in our understanding of mental disorders, including psychosis and drug abuse. Sophisticated behavioral measures combined with elegant molecular, cellular and systems approaches, along with powerful imaging studies in humans, have produced a large number of high-profile reports that are likely to have a positive impact on health issues. For example, the biological bases of reward processes are implicating several catecholamines and a variety of brain regions and signaling mechanisms. We plan to highlight these new advances by including some of the researchers at the forefront of this field (and many of them can be considered junior scientists) in an attempt to provide a unique opportunity to discuss recent advances in the understanding of how catecholamine systems may contribute to the pathophysiology and treatment of those conditions.

For the 2009 GRC on Catecholamines, in Honor of Irwin J. Kopin, 2 speakers will be chosen for the ‘Young Investigators’ session, Award winners will receive up to $2500 for travel expenses. If you would like to be considered to speak in this session you must be 5 years or less post-PhD. Eligible applicants should send an abstract of less than 250 words describing your presentation, and an NIH Biosketch, and have 1 letter of reference sent by email to: Regina Carelli at rcarelli@unc.edu before May 1, 2009.


SUNDAY
2:00 pm - 9:00 pmArrival and Check-in (Office Closed 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm)
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmWelcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff and Chair, Patricio O’Donnell (University of Maryland)
7:40 pm - 8:30 pm DATA BLITZ
Discussion Leader: Gina Carelli (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm KEYNOTE ADDRESS
8:30 pm - 9:10 pm Jim Surmeier (Northwestern University)
"Dichotomous dopaminergic modulation of striatal plasticity in health and disease"
9:10 pm - 9:30 pm Discussion
MONDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
8:30 amGroup Photo
9:00 am - 10:00 am YOUNG INVESTIGATOR PRESENTATIONS
9:00 am - 9:20 am Manuel Mameli (University of Geneva)
9:20 am - 9:30 am Discussion
9:30 am - 9:50 am Debra Bangasser (Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia)
9:50 am - 10:00 am Discussion
10:00 am Coffee Break
10:30 am - 12:30 pm CATECHOLAMINE SYSTEMS: NOVEL VIEWS ON ANATOMICAL ORGANIZATION
Discussion Leader: Susan Sesack (University of Pittsburgh)
10:30 am - 10:50 am Suzanne Haber (University of Rochester)
"Multiple integrative basal ganglia networks: the place of dopamine in a complex system"
10:50 am - 11:00 am Discussion
11:00 am - 11:20 am Satoshi Ikemoto (NIDA)
"Mediolateral topographic connectivity of the mesolimbic dopamine system and its reward function"
11:20 am - 11:30 am Discussion
11:30 am - 11:50 pm Gloria Meredith (Rosalind Franklin University)
"How to rewire the adult basal ganglia: Structural plasticity in dopaminergic pathways"
11:50 pm - 12:00 pm Discussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pm Elizabeth Van Bockstaele (Thomas Jefferson University)
"Cannabinoid modulation of noradrenergic circuits"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pm Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session 1
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm CATECHOLAMINES AND SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY
Discussion Leader: Mark Ungless (Imperial College London)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pm Marina Wolf (Rosalind Franklin University)
"AMPA receptor plasticity during cocaine withdrawal"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pm Discussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pm Mark Thomas (University of Minnesota)
"Cocaine experience drives synaptic and intrinsic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pm Discussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pm Kuei-Yuan Tseng (Rosalind Franklin University)
"Age matters when dopamine and endocannabinoid receptors meet in the prefrontal cortex"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pm Discussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pm Antonello Bonci (UCSF)
"Fresh news on synaptic plasticity and substance abuse"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pm Discussion
TUESDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pm CATECHOLAMINES IN REWARD AND DRUG ADDICTION
Discussion Leader: Nathaniel Daw (New York University)
9:00 am - 9:20 am Sue Grigson (Penn State University)
"Dopamine: Reward, aversion and addiction"
9:20 am - 9:30 am Discussion
9:30 am - 9:50 am Toni Shippenberg (NIDA)
"Regulation of mesocorticolimbic dopamine neurons by endogenous opioids: implications for addiction treatment"
9:50 am - 10:00 am Discussion
10:00 am Coffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 am Geoffrey Schoenbaum (University of Maryland)
"Does orbitofrontal cortex contribute to error signaling by dopamine neurons?"
10:50 am - 11:00 am Discussion
11:00 am - 11:20 am Paul Phillips (University of Washington)
"Striatal dopamine release during valuation processes"
11:20 am - 11:30 am Discussion
11:30 am - 11:50 am Paul Shepard (University of Maryland)
"The presence of absence: Habenular regulation of dopamine neurons and the encoding of negative outcomes"
11:50 am - 12:00 pm Discussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pm Athina Markou (UCSD)
"Catecholamines in nicotine dependence"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pm Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session 1
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm COGNITIVE EFFECTS OF CATECHOLAMINES
Discussion Leader: Josh Berke (University of Michigan)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pm Stan Floresco (University of British Columbia)
"Mesocorticolimbic Dopamine Modulation of Different Forms of Behavioral Flexibility"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pm Discussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pm John Salamone (University of Connecticut)
"Dopamine/adenosine interactions in the regulation of effort-related functions"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pm Discussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pm Joe Cheer (University of Maryland)
"Endogenous cannabinoid control of motivated behavior: implications for addictive disorders"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pm Discussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pm Barry Waterhouse (Drexel University)
"Catecholamines, Psychostimulants and Sustained Attention"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pm Discussion
WEDNESDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pm CATECHOLAMINES IN NEUROPSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS
Discussion Leader: Mark Wightman (University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)
9:00 am - 9:20 amMichael Zigmond (University of Pittsburgh)
"Triggering self-protective mechanisms in DA neurons: Studies with models of Parkinson’s Disease"
9:20 am - 9:30 am Discussion
9:30 am - 9:50 am Gustavo Murer (Universidad de Buenos Aires)
"What makes the basal ganglia more permeable to spontaneous cortical activity in Parkinson’s disease?"
9:50 am - 10:00 am Discussion
10:00 am Coffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 am Nancy Zahnisser (University of Colorado Denver)
"Dynamic Regulation of Rat Brain Dopamine Transporters: Mechanisms and Functional Consequences"
10:50 am - 11:00 am Discussion
11:00 am - 11:20 am Michael Levine (UCLA)
"Dopamine and glutamate: Alterations in genetic models of disease"
11:20 am - 11:30 am Discussion
11:30 am - 11:50 am Michael Frank (Brown University)
"Reinforcement learning and decision making as a function of dopaminergic medication status in Parkinson’s disease: Computational and empirical studies"
11:50 am - 12:00 pm Discussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pm Rita Valentino (University of Pennsylvania)
"The locus coeruleus: An emotional arousal system that is dynamically sensitive to stress"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pm Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session 2
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pm SEX DIFFERENCES AND CATECHOLAMINES
Discussion Leader: Gretchen Snyder (Intracellular Therapies)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pm Ippolita Cantuti-Castelvetri (Massachussetts General Hospital)
"Gender differences in Parkinson’s disease"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pm Discussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pm Victoria Luine (CUNY)
"Stress-dependent alterations in catecholaminergic and cognitive function are dependent on sex"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pm Discussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pm Jill Becker (University of Michigan)
"The role of dopamine in sex differences in motivation"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pm Discussion
9:00 pm - 9:30 pmBusiness Meeting
(Nominations for the next Vice Chair; Fill out Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss future Site & Scheduling preferences; Election of the next Vice Chair)
THURSDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 10:00 am RECEPTOR HETERODIMERS, NOVEL MECHANISMS AND TRANSGENIC APPROACHES
Discussion Leader: Danny Winder (Vanderbilt University)
9:00 am - 9:20 am Susan George (University of Toronto)
"Distinct signaling in brain by the dopamine D1-D2 receptor heteromer"
9:20 am - 9:30 am Discussion
9:30 am - 9:50 am Kjell Fuxe (Karolinska Institutet)
"Dopamine receptors in heterodimers and receptor mosaics of different types of receptors"
9:50 am - 10:00 am Discussion
10:00 am - 10:20 amDavid Weinshenker (Emory University)
"TrkB, or not TrkB: that is the question!"
10:20 am - 10:30 am Discussion
10:30 am Coffee Break
11:00 am - 11:20 amRichard Palmiter (University of Washington)
"Genetic modification of dopamine neuron activity and the behavioral consequences"
11:20 am - 11:30 am Discussion
11:30 am - 11:50 am Xiaoxi Zhuang (University of Chicago)
"Gene-environment interactions in food-seeking behavior"
11:50 am - 12:00 pm Discussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmSteve Thomas (University of Pennsylvania)
"Monoamines, memory and mouse PTSD"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pm Discussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session 2
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 8:30 pm ADOLESCENCE
Discussion Leader: Donita Robinson (University of North Carolina Chapel Hill)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pm Sue Andersen (Harvard Medical School)
"Enhanced motivational salience during adolescence and its role in psychopathology"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pm Discussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pm Adriana Galvan (UCLA)
"The role of catecholamines in adolescent development"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pm Discussion
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm KEYNOTE LECTURE
8:30 pm - 9:10 pm Eric Nestler (Mt. Sinai School of Medicine)
"Molecular mechanisms of drug addiction"
9:10 pm - 9:30 pm Discussion
FRIDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 amDeparture

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1 R13 DA026631-01 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

 
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