Gordon Research Conferences
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Conference Program
 
Catecholamines
August 11-16, 2013
Mount Snow Resort
West Dover, VT
Chair:
Antonello Bonci

Vice Chair:
Paul E. Phillips

Related Meeting Information
The Catecholamines Gordon Research Conference was held in conjunction with the Catecholamines Gordon Research Seminar. Please refer to the Catecholamines GRS web page for more information.

The 2013 GRC on Catecholamines will focus on cutting-edge developments in catecholamine research. In recent years, catecholamines have been the focus of investigations using a broad range of approaches from molecular biology to behavior and clinical studies. One of the characteristics of the field is that neuronal systems using catecholamines have much in common, although investigators who focus on particular catecholamines or on different actions of the same catecholamine are often unaware of complementary aspects of catecholamine research. It is increasingly apparent that continued progress will require increasingly integrated approaches in studies of catecholamine biology, function and dysfunction. Thus, molecular biologists are being drawn to more integrated systems approaches and behavioral biologists are exploiting many molecular approaches. In addition, because DA, NE and epinephrine serve as neurotransmitters and hormones throughout the phylogenetic scale, studies are possible in simple organisms where powerful genetic tools are available. Finally, recent innovative work allows the elucidation of catecholamine neurotransmission during natural animal behaviors, an important focus of the 2013 sessions. Thus, in the 2013 meeting talks will range from very basic research on mechanisms of catecholamine neurotransmission to talks integrating catecholamine physiology, pharmacology and behavior. Furthermore, the past few years have witnessed a tremendous advance in our understanding of mental and neurological disorders, including drug abuse and Parkinson’s disease. Sophisticated behavioral measures combined with elegant molecular, cellular and systems approaches, along with powerful imaging studies in humans, have produced a large number of high-profile reports that are likely to have a positive impact on health issues. For example, the biological bases of reward processes are implicating several catecholamines and a variety of brain regions and signaling mechanisms. We plan to highlight these new advances by including some of the researchers at the forefront of this field (and many of them can be considered junior scientists) in an attempt to provide a unique opportunity to discuss recent advances in the understanding of how catecholamine systems may contribute to the pathophysiology and treatment of those conditions.


Contributors

SUNDAY
2:00 pm - 9:00 pmArrival and Check-in
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 7:40 pmWelcome / Introductory Comments by GRC Site Staff
7:40 pm - 8:30 pmData Blitz
Discussion Leader: Paul E. M. Phillips (University of Washington)
8:30 pm - 9:30 pmKeynote Address
Discussion Leader: Paul E. M. Phillips (University of Washington)
8:30 pm - 9:15 pmRoy Wise (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
"The discoveries of dopamine"
9:15 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
MONDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmCatecholamine Receptors and Transporters
Discussion Leader: Kim A. Neve (Oregon Health and Sciences University)
9:00 am - 9:20 amAmy Newman (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
"Drug design for addiction - molecular determinants of selectivity and efficacy at the dopamine D3 receptor"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amVirginia M. Pickel (Weill Cornell Medical College)
"Targeting dopamine D2 and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the VTA"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 amGroup Photo / Coffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 amMarc G. Caron (Duke University)
"Functionally selective/biased signaling at D1 and D2 dopamine receptors"
10:50 am - 11:00 amDiscussion
11:00 am - 11:20 amDavid Weinshenker (Emory)
"Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces a Gi-to-Gs switch in D2 receptor coupling and cocaine hypersensitivity via beta-arrestin2"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amAlexxai Kravitz (National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases)
"Does reducing striatal Drd2 receptor levels make more mice susceptible to obesity?"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmJohn Meitzen (North Carolina State University)
"Enhanced striatal β1-adrenergic receptor expression following hormone loss in adulthood is programmed by both early sexual differentiation and puberty"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmCircuit-Level Regulation and Effects of Catecholamine Function
Discussion Leader: Garret D. Stuber (University of North Carolina)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmYolanda Mateo (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
"Endocannabinoid modulation of cholinergic evoked DA release: what is the role of glutamate?"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmRichard D. Palmiter (University of Washington)
"Roles for dopamine and glutamate signaling during pavlovian learning"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmNaoshige Uchida (Harvard University)
"Dissecting computations in the dopamine reward circuit"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmSusan M. Ferguson (University of Washington)
"DREADDful insights into the neural circuits that regulate addiction and decision-making"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
TUESDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmSynaptic Regulation and Effects of Catecholamine Transmission
Discussion Leader: Carlos Paladini (University of Texas, San Antonio)
9:00 am - 9:20 amMarisela Morales (National Institute on Drug Abuse)
"Subcellular segregation of dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling by VTA neurons"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amVeronica A. Alvarez (National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism)
"Functional integration of dopaminergic and glutamatergic signaling by VTA neurons"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 amMarta E. Soden (University of Washington)
"Characterization of the firing and membrane properties of visually-identified dopaminergic neurons in organotypic and acute mesencephalic slices"
10:50 am - 11:00 amDiscussion
11:00 am - 11:20 amJohn T. Williams (Oregon Health and Science University)
"Spontaneous miniature IPSCs mediated by dopamine in the substantial nigra"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amElyssa Margolis (University of California, San Francisco)
"Direct interactions of mu and delta opioid receptor signaling in VTA neurons"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmRobert C. Malenka (Stanford University)
"Reward and aversion in VTA dopamine neurons"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmCatecholamines in Affective Behaviors
Discussion Leader: Matthew J. Wanat (University of Washington)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmTerry E. Robinson (University of Michigan)
"Dopamine and desire"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmKate M. Wassum (University of California, Los Angeles)
"Phasic mesolimbic dopamine release and reward-seeking actions"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmKay M. Tye (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
"Neural encoding dynamics of VTA-projecting lateral hypothalamic neurons in a reward-related task"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmR. Mark Wightman (University of North Carolina)
"Norepinephrine release and function evaluated in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis revealed by voltammetry"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
WEDNESDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmCatecholamines and Cognition
Discussion Leader: Patricio O'Donnell (Pfizer)
9:00 am - 9:20 amBarry D. Waterhouse (Drexel University)
"Heterogeneous properties of locus coeruleus efferents to prefrontal and motor cortical circuitries"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amJeremy K. Seamans (University of British Columbia)
"What catecholaminergic modulation tells us about anterior cingulate cortex function"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 amMark E. Walton (University of Oxford)
"Weighing up the benefits: mesolimbic dopamine and updating value in a changing world"
10:50 am - 11:00 amDiscussion
11:00 am - 11:20 amRegina M. Carelli (University of North Carolina)
"Dynamics of dopamine signaling in the nucleus accumbens during higher-order learning"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amSaleem M. Nicola (Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
"Nucleus accumbens dopamine and flexible approach"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmSteven A. Thomas (University of Pennsylvania)
"Beta-adrenergic receptors in cognition"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:00 pm - 7:30 pmBusiness Meeting
Nominations for the next Vice Chair; Fill out Conference Evaluation Forms; Discuss future Site & Scheduling preferences; Election of the next Vice Chair
7:30 pm - 9:30 pmCatecholamines and Substance Abuse
Discussion Leader: Ingo Willuhn (University of Washington)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmJacqueline F. McGinty (Medial University of South Carolina)
"Cocaine self administration induces biphasic neuroadaptations in prefrontal cortex during early abstinence"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmDonita L. Robinson (University of North Carolina)
"Persistent effects of moderate adolescent alcohol exposure on gene expression and dopamine release in mesocorticolimbic pathways"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 8:50 pmLinda J. Porrino (Wake Forest School of Medicine)
"Predicting the functional response to cocaine cues in a non-human primate model of cocaine exposure"
8:50 pm - 9:00 pmDiscussion
9:00 pm - 9:20 pmNancy R. Zahniser (University of Colorado, Denver)
"How dopamine transporter number contributes to individual differences in cocaine responsiveness and addiction-like behaviors"
9:20 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
THURSDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 am - 12:30 pmCatecholamines in Neurological and Psychiatric Disease
Discussion Leader: Joseph F. Cheer (University of Maryland, Baltimore)
9:00 am - 9:20 amMarie-Francoise Chesselet (University of California, Los Angeles)
"Alterations in dopamine homeostasis and risk of Parkinson's disease: from man to mice and back"
9:20 am - 9:30 amDiscussion
9:30 am - 9:50 amDavid S. Goldstein (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)
"A final common pathway in the death of catecholamine neurons"
9:50 am - 10:00 amDiscussion
10:00 amCoffee Break
10:30 am - 10:50 amXiaoxi Zhuang (University of Chicago)
"Corticostriatal plasticity and 'learned' motor inhibition in Parkinson's disease"
10:50 am - 11:00 amDiscussion
11:00 am - 11:20 amRita Valentino (University of Pennsylvania)
"The sex-biased phosphoproteome: Basis for sex differences in neuropsychiatric disorders"
11:20 am - 11:30 amDiscussion
11:30 am - 11:50 amRandy D. Blakely (Vanderbilt University)
"A rare opportunity for progress on ADHD mechanisms: The DAT 559V mouse"
11:50 am - 12:00 pmDiscussion
12:00 pm - 12:20 pmAnthony A. Grace (University of Pittsburgh)
"Dopamine neuron dysregulation in schizophrenia and depression: It's not their fault!"
12:20 pm - 12:30 pmDiscussion
12:30 pmLunch
1:30 pm - 4:00 pmFree Time
4:00 pm - 6:00 pmPoster Session
6:00 pmDinner
7:30 pm - 8:30 pmYoung Investigator Presentations
Discussion Leader: Antonello Bonci (National Institution on Drug Abuse)
7:30 pm - 7:50 pmVincent Pascoli (University of Geneva)
"Parsing cocaine-evoked plasticity onto nucleus accumbens D1R-MSNs to suppress compulsive seeking"
7:50 pm - 8:00 pmDiscussion
8:00 pm - 8:20 pmThomas S. Hnasko (University of California, San Diego)
"Excitatory neurons in the VTA: properties and projections"
8:20 pm - 8:30 pmDiscussion
8:30 pm - 9:30 pmKeynote Address
Discussion Leader: Antonello Bonci (National Institution on Drug Abuse)
8:30 pm - 9:10 pmSusan R. Sesack (University of Pittsburgh)
"Understanding dopamine neuron connectivity: passion and prudence"
9:10 pm - 9:30 pmDiscussion
FRIDAY
7:30 am - 8:30 amBreakfast
9:00 amDeparture

Funding for this conference was made possible (in part) by 1 R13 DA035550-01 from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

 
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